Title

Dental infections increase the likelihood of hospital admissions among adult patients with sickle cell disease

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2013

Abstract

The objective: To determine if dental infections increase the likelihood of hospital admission among adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Basic Research Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) pooled for the years 2006 through 2008. Prevalence ratios (PR) for the effects of interest were estimated using Poisson regression with robust estimates of the variance. Participants: Adults, aged 18 and over, diagnosed with SCD using ICD-9-CM codes excluding participants discharged with a code for sickle cell trait. Main outcome measure: Emergency department (ED) visit disposition, dichotomised to represent whether or not the ED visit ended in admission versus being treated and released. Results: Among patients having a sickle cell crisis, those with dental infections were 72% more likely to be admitted compared to those not having dental infections (PR=1.72, 95%CI 1.58-1.87). No association was observed among adult SCD patients not having a sickle crisis event. Based on preliminary data from this analysis, prevention of dental infection among patients with SCD could result in an estimated cost saving of $2.5 million dollars per year. Conclusions: Having a dental infection complicated by a sickle cell crisis significantly increases the likelihood of hospital admission among adult SCD patients presenting to the ED. © BASCD 2013.

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