Title

Association between long-term NSAID use and opioid abuse among patients with breast cancer

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2019

Abstract

Background: Improving survival rates among patients with breast cancer has been associated with an increase in the prevalence of co-morbidities like cancer-related pain. Opioids are an important component in the management of pain among these patients. However, the progression from judicious use to abuse defeats the aim of pain control. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended as the first step in cancer-related pain management. Due to their anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplastic and neuroprotective properties, NSAIDs have been shown to reduce the risk of progression of certain cancers including breast cancers. In this study, we assessed whether an association exists between long-term NSAID use and opioid abuse among breast cancer survivors. We also explored the relationship between long-term NSAID use and inpatient mortality and length of stay (LOS). Methods: Using ICD-9-CM codes, we identified and selected women aged 18 years and older with breast cancer from the National Inpatient Sample. Our primary predictor was a history of long-term NSAID use. Multivariable regression models were employed in assessing the association between long-term NSAID use and opioid abuse, inpatient mortality and LOS. Results: Among 170,644 women with breast cancer, 7,838 (4.6%) reported a history of long-term NSAID use. Patients with a history of long-term NSAID use had lower odds of opioid abuse (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.53; 95% CI [0.32–0.88]), lower in-hospital mortality (aOR 0.52; 95% CI [0.45–0.60]) and shorter LOS (7.12 vs. 8.11 days). Discussion: Further studies are needed to understand the underlying mechanism of the association between long-term NSAID use and opioid abuse.

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